AirCam News

finish-mikeWe have had two recently completed AirCam builds submitted to us and wanted to share them with the AirCam community. One build is from Mike McLoad and the other completed build was done by Bill Hood.

Mike McLoad

This beautiful amphibian is the most recent AirCam kit finished we know of. Mike McLoad received his Airworthiness Certificate early this month in Sebring. His AirCam  has 2180 Clamars, 912s engine, basic analog panels and weighs in at 1408 lbs empty. Good Job Mike!!!!

Bill Hood

This is Bill Hood with his AirCam in eastern North Carolina. Check out Bill’s panel. Makes us want to go for a night flight!

Additional info from Bill : G3X, Garmin 400 GPS, remote transponder, MGL engine monitors, Garmin SL40 Com

awardCongratulations to Bob Schaeberle for taking home the Outstanding Amphibian Award at Airventure 2014!

Bob also exhibited his AirCam at the Greenville International Seaplane Fly-in.

Below are some pictures Bob sent us from Greenville.

garage-doorCustomers often ask," How much space does it take to build an AirCam?  What tools will I need?  What is the preferred order of building the sections?"

Before the 1960s garages tended to be smaller then those from the 60s -90s.  Again recently the garages have decreased in size. That being said an AirCam airframe's sections can be completely built in any single or larger garage.  However it may not be able to be assembled.  Let's investigate further. All sections of the AirCam except for the fuselage can easily be built in any one car garage. However, in a single car garage, after finishing a few sections you would need to make room for the next section(s) you're building by storing the completed  sections off-site.  In a two car garage it is not necessary to store completed sections off premises.

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