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by jinshuiqian0713 » Mon Aug 05, 2019 6:29 am

PHILADELPHIA -- A federal judge is slowing down the proposed US$765 million settlement of NFL concussion claims, questioning if theres enough money to cover 20,000 retired players. Cheap Nike Shoes From China Free Shipping . U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody denied preliminary approval of the plan on Tuesday because shes worried the money could run out sooner than expected. She also raised concerns that anyone who gets concussion damages from the NFL would be barred from suing the NCAA or other amateur football leagues. "I am primarily concerned that not all retired NFL football players who ultimately receive a qualifying diagnosis or their (families) ... will be paid," the judge wrote. The proposed settlement, negotiated over several months, is designed to last at least 65 years. The awards would vary based on an ex-players age and diagnosis. A younger retiree with Lou Gehrigs disease would get $5 million, those with serious dementia cases would get $3 million and an 80-year-old with early dementia would get $25,000. Retirees without symptoms would get baseline screening and follow-up care if needed. "Even if only 10 per cent of retired NFL football players eventually receive a qualifying diagnosis," the judge wrote, "it is difficult to see how the Monetary Award Fund would have the funds available over its lifespan to pay all claimants at these significant award levels." She asked for more raw financial data before scheduling a fairness hearing this year, when objectors can question the plan. The objectors could later decide to opt out of it. Law professor Gabe Feldman, who directs the sports law program at the Tulane University Law School, called the ruling a setback but said "theres no reason to panic." "The question remains whether this gives pause to some of the retired players and makes them question whether this is a settlement they want to be a part of," he said. Some critics said the NFL, with more than $9 billion in annual revenue, was getting away lightly. But the players lawyers said they would face huge challenges just to get the case to trial. They would have to prove the injuries were linked to the players NFL service and should not be handled through league arbitration. They could end up with nothing. Sol Weiss, a lead lawyer for the ex-players, remained confident the class action settlement will ultimately be approved. He said he was confident "that there will be enough money to cover these claims for 65 years." NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said league officials were "confident that the settlement is fair and adequate and look forward to demonstrating that to the court." More than 4,500 former players have filed suit, some accusing the league of fraud for its handling of concussions. They include former Dallas Cowboys running back Tony Dorsett and Super Bowl-winning Chicago Bears quarterback Jim McMahon, who suffers from dementia. The judges hand-picked mediator, former federal judge Layn R. Phillips, led several months of negotiations last year and has called the deal fair to both sides. The settlement would include $675 million for compensatory claims for players with neurological symptoms, $75 million for baseline testing for asymptomatic men and $10 million for medical research and education. The NFL also would pay an additional $112 million to the players lawyers for their fees and expenses, for a total payout of nearly $900 million. The NCAA clause is apparently designed to prevent plaintiffs from double dipping. Feldman said he was unsure why the NFL would insist on that. Given the judges ruling, the two sides could offer more evidence the fund would be stable, change the payout formula or perhaps have the NFL add more money to the pot. Otherwise, they may be left to start over. "I think its a pretty efficient way of doing things, rather than bring it up for the first time at the fairness hearing," Matt Mitten, who directs the National Sports Law Institute at the Marquette University Law School, said of the judges opinion. "Some of these guys need the money right now." Cheap Nike Shoes Wholesale .com) - The New York Islanders will try to solve their issues against Central Division opponents when they visit the Minnesota Wild for Tuesdays battle at Xcel Energy Center. Nike Shoes Wholesale Free Shipping .A. Dickey earned an American League Gold Glove on Tuesday to become the first Toronto Blue Jays pitcher to win the award. http://www.nikeshoesfromchina.com/ . According to TSN Hockey Insider Pierre LeBrun, Brodeurs agent Pat Brisson has spoken to six teams so far regarding the veteran goaltender.SPRINGFIELD, Mass. -- Alonzo Mourning first thanked all of the usual people when he was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame: His coaches, his teachers, and the foster mother who raised him. Then he turned to those who made it possible for his unique journey to the sports highest honour. With one of the doctors who performed his kidney transplant in attendance, the former Georgetown and Miami Heat star discussed the disease that threatened his life and almost ended his career. He also thanked out his cousin-turned-kidney donor, Jason Cooper. "There was such purpose to my life at that point and I never doubted -- no matter how long the odds -- that it was possible," Mourning said during Friday nights induction ceremony. "I just thought, This is much bigger than me. I had a goal set to win a championship that was denied when I got kidney disease." Mourning returned to win the 2006 NBA title with the Heat and complete a career that led him to the Springfield shrine. He was inducted in a class that also included former NBA commissioner David Stern, NCAA championship-winning coaches Nolan Richardson and Gary Williams and six-time NBA All-Star Mitch Richmond. The womens team from Immaculata College was also honoured, along with Lithuania star Sarunas Marciulionis. Former Indiana Pacers coach Bob "Slick" Leonard, the late Nat "Sweetwater" Clifton of the New York Knicks and the late Guy Rodgers of Temple rounded out the class. Stern was honoured for his three decades of leadership that transformed the league from struggling teams and tape-delayed finals to an international juggernaut. His introductory video included praise from NBA stars like Michael Jordan, Bill Russell and Magic Johnson but also from Nelson Mandela. "Everything we do is always about the game," Stern said, asking thee entire crowd to stand so he could thank the former players, fans and family members who made the leagues success possible. Cheap Nike Shoes From China. "The reason Im here is because of thousands of people over the years who have done so much." Stern had five current Hall of Famers welcome him into the Hall, from Russell, the former Celtics star, to former deputy commissioner Russ Granik -- a group that represented his wide-ranging influence as he rose from working at his fathers deli to the pinnacle of the sport. "Under his leadership, the NBA rose to terrific heights, on and off the court," Richmond said in his acceptance speech. Sterns induction capped a festive night at Symphony Hall in downtown Springfield, across the highway from the museum that commemorates the citys claim as the sports birthplace. Williams, who led Maryland to 11 consecutive NCAA tournament appearances and the 2002 title, said enshrinement in the hall was "as big a thrill as you can get as a coach." Then came Arkansas Richardson, who celebrated his induction with a revival-style speech peppered with swipes at referees and jokes about God and the devil playing basketball. Richardson recounted a playing career in which he went from 21 points per game to 14 and belatedly realized it was more important to win. Thanking his teachers and coaches and family, he said, "You have to have a team to reach a dream." "This isnt talking about a national championship team," he said. "This is about the team that helped raise Nolan Sam Richardson Jr." Leonard, the winningest coach in ABA history, followed with a contrasting style, accenting his quiet tone with a Southern drawl and guessing that he was one of the oldest inductees in the Halls history. "For me, it took a while," Leonard. 82, said, "but Im going out in style." 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